Andrew Krenzel

About Me

Andrew Krenzel is a Freshman Game Design Major. He was born in Pennsylvania but has lived in Kansas, Texas, Connecticut, and upstate New York due to his father’s career in the military. He lived in the Kansas City area before coming to Bradley and brought with him his passions for video games, history, and fencing. He is combining his passions to create video games that are able to convey history in an impactful, engaging, and entertaining way that is accessible to younger generations.
He was inspired by his father’s time and stories in the army as a tank commander but discovered his calling in his senior year of high school. Andrew was a teacher’s assistant and saw a World War Two veteran of the 101st Airborne Division, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, E Company capture the full and undivided attention of previously disinterested students. He realized that the more engaging and interactive the presentation of history became, the more likely the participants were going to remember their experiences with it. This has inspired to pursue a career in the medium he has become the most familiar and involved with, video games, and to tell the untold stories of history with games.

Featured Projects


Race to Vienna

Race to Vienna

Andrew was the designer, coder, and artist of the game. This was his first game, an endless runner, and was assembled in Unity. The art was created using Adobe Illustrator and Adobe Animate. It was completed for his introductory Interactive Media class for his midterms in the fall of 2018.

Race to Vienna Design Journal

Race to Vienna Design Journal

Andrew was the writer of the document. It was a compilation of all of the previous documentation, art, assets, and concepts along with information regarding potential consumers. The document was assembled in Adobe InDesign and was completed for introductory Interactive Media class for his final in the Winter of 2018.

Lest We Forget

Lest We Forget

Andrew was the sole artist. Last year marked the centenary of the signing of the Armistice that ended World War One. To commemorate this event Andrew put together a piece in Blender using the poppy, a symbol of the loss of life during The Great War as a key piece.